Mostrando las entradas con la etiqueta hospital. Mostrar todas las entradas
Mostrando las entradas con la etiqueta hospital. Mostrar todas las entradas

viernes, 23 de febrero de 2018

Rollercoaster


   Waking up had never been that difficult. My eyelids felt heavy and sticky. In the glimpses I had been able to witness, I couldn’t really see anything. Besides, they happened every so often, when my body would come back from the induced state the doctors had put me on. I remember opening my eyes wide, right in the middle of the main surgery. After that, I opened them slightly and wasn’t able to see a thing because it was blurry and pitch black. I remember the scent of disinfectant, though.

 I did not now how long I stayed in there; it felt like days, maybe weeks. The day I was finally able to properly open my eyes, I was surprised to find myself in a large hospital bed. Of course, I knew all along I had been in a hospital but there was no way I or my insurance could afford to have such a nice room. I turned on my chest and looked to the other side of the room, finding a very large window overlooking… Well, nothing. I was apparently in a very tall building because I could only see clouds.

 It rained soon after; at about the same time a nurse came in and checked my pulse and other vital signs. She asked if I was able to sit, so I tried to rise myself and sit on my behind, like people do. But I couldn’t. I felt a jolt of pain electrifying my body. She helped me back to the position I had been before and said she was going to get a doctor and some painkillers. The only one I wanted to see was the medication. I had never been a fan of doctors, especially when they tend to ask too many questions.

 Sure enough, a rather large man with a white robe entered the room minutes later and started firing questions. At first, I tried to keep up with him but eventually I stopped answering because he wanted very specific responses that I wasn’t able to answer properly. Besides, he seemed angry somehow, almost yelling at me for not knowing what he was asking.  He hurt me a bit when he grabbed my arm to check my blood pressure and then another jolt ran through my body when he checked my backside.

 That second instant of pain was enough. I don’t even know how, but I turned around and jumped out of bed, away from him. It hurt, but I didn’t care. I reached the doorway and there I faced him and demanded him to go out of my room. He seemed sort of amused by my demand but I insisted, as some tears started to run down my face. Not only that, something had happened and I was bleeding on the floor, heavily. The nurse ran out to get help and the doctor did the same, not before looking at me as if I was a monster. I wanted to die right then and there.

 A group of nurses took care of me. They seemed kind and did a wonderful job at patching me up again. Apparently, one of the stitches had come loose after I walked out of bed. So they had to fix it, giving me more painkillers and even a special medicine to sleep all night. They had intended for me to have something to eat but I seemed far too tired to do that, so they decided to leave that for another moment. I remember sleeping like a baby, having no dreams or pain. Only a great moment of peace.

 I woke up the next morning to a face I had never seen before. It was a woman, older than the other nurses, wearing a nice knitted sweater and matching skirt. She seemed kind, at least if her smile was to be believed. She excused herself for being there but told me she had wanted to talk to me for a while and she had decided it was best if she just waited for me to wake up. I felt a little bit weird at the moment, but the arrival of one of the nurses made the room feel a little bit cozier.

 After a brief check on my status, the nurse left not before telling me she would bring me some food in a moment. I smiled at her because, obviously, I hadn’t eaten a single piece of food for days or even weeks, only having a liquid pumped into my veins. When I thought of food, I pictured chocolate cake and a good big piece of red meat and a cup of tea with lots of cookies and even a big bowl of vanilla ice cream.  Then, I remembered I was in a hospital and realized they weren’t known for great food.

 I was left alone with the woman in the sofa. She stood up when the nurse left and asked me how I was feeling. I did not know how to answer the question and she seemed to notice that because she then asked what my favorite movie was. Instantly, I was able to tell her I had many favorites and would never be able to choose only one. She laughed and told me she loved romantic dramas but also science fiction films with a lot of gore. She knew it was a curious mix, but it worked for her.

 That silly question got us talking for a whole hour, even after the nurse came back with my food tray. As I had imagined, the food was very bland and not especially appealing but it was something and I ate it all within minutes. The woman, who happened to be a psychiatrist for the hospital, was a very funny person and I have to say I felt safe with her Besides, she seemed intelligent enough not to drill me about what had happened. Obviously, it was her job to know about it and ask me how I was after that ordeal, but she knew exactly how to manage the whole situation.

 She came back every day for a week, as I slowly got better. She was just outside the room when another doctor, a kinder one, came in and removed the stitches. It hurt a little but I never felt a jolt of pain again. The man told me that it was all coming up very well and that I could be out of the hospital in a week or even less. That reminded me to ask who was paying for the whole thing but the doctor pretended not to listen to what I said and instead made me remember I had to rest properly.

 I asked the psychiatrist too but she authentically did not know who was paying for everything. We had talked about how I had left my home years ago and how I wasn’t in touch with my parents or any of my relatives. Besides, I told her how they had rejected me when I was outed in school and hypothesized that they wouldn’t even look at me if they knew what my life had come to. She asked if I missed them and I confessed sometimes I did. But most times, they weren’t even in my mind.

 Two days before my release, a nurse and the psychiatrist joined me for a walk around the hospital. They told me I was going to need a lot of physical therapy to be able to walk normally but that it was almost a given that I would be able to do so in a few months. Of course, the therapy had already been paid but, again, no one seemed aware of who was paying for all of it. And to be honest, I had grown tired of asking. Maybe after it was all in the past, I would be able to properly investigate the whole thing.

 The day I was released from the hospital, all the nurses that took care of me came to say goodbye. I cried and they cried too. We had become closer and I felt them as sisters or aunts. My psychiatrist came too, telling me she would be there if I ever wanted to have a word or if I needed something. She even gave me her personal phone number. I thanked them all and went back home, to a small and dirty little apartment in a crappy neighborhood and the reality of having no prospects in life.

 The very next day, I got a letter. A written one. Of course, that was highly unusual. The moment I read it, I felt weak and wanted to run away but I didn’t know where. Suddenly, I felt in an open field where I was an easy prey for anyone to take advantage of.

 Then, I remembered my psychiatrist’s number. I asked her to meet me and she gave me her address. I arrived there within the hour, crying and in a state I hadn’t been in days. I explained to her the contents of the letter: the revelation of the person that had paid for my hospital expenses. It was him.

viernes, 24 de noviembre de 2017

Malditos idiotas

   Cuando me desperté, estaba en una cama conectado a una de esas máquinas que hacen ruidos repetitivos. Un par de tubos iban y venían y algunos otros estaban conectados a mis manos. Me dio ganas de rascarme apenas los sentí, pero no pude hacerlo porque el solo pensamiento de moverme hizo que todo el cuerpo me doliera, como si una descarga eléctrica de alta potencia pasara por todo mi cuerpo. El dolor fue amainando y fue justo cuando ya no me dolía nada cuando la enfermera entró a la habitación.

 Pensé, tontamente, que había venido porque de alguna manera la estúpida maquina había detectado mi dolor. Pero no, solo había venido a revisar que estuviese vivo, respirando y absorbiendo el suero al que estaba conectado. Quise fingir que estaba dormido. No supe porqué, pero creo que no estaba listo para que la gente supiera que había despertado, vuelto a este mundo de mierda que me había puesto en esa cama de hospital. Pero no pude hacerlo y ella salió apresurada de la habitación.

 En poco tiempo otra enfermera y un doctor vinieron a visitarme. Tuvieron para conmigo las palabras de siempre que dicen cuando alguien está en un hospital y las mismas preguntas estúpidas del estilo: “¿Se siente usted bien?”. Imbéciles, pensé. Pero no lo dije. De hecho, no podía hablar porque la garganta me dolía demasiado. El doctor ordenó que me trajeran algo de tomar y fue entonces cuando me di cuenta de que tenía un hambre feroz y hubiese preferido un batido de carne al jugo de zanahoria que trajeron.

 Me lo tomé en silencio y solo, puesto que ya era tarde y nadie se quedó conmigo para ver si me tomaba el espeso liquido o no. No estaba feo pero el sabor o la consistencia del dichoso jugo no me importaba en lo más mínimo. Me lo tomé mirando por la ventana, como si pudiera ver algo. La verdad era que el otro lado parecía la boca de un lobo, completamente oscuro y sin ruidos que denunciaran exactamente donde estaba. Porque de idiota no me había fijado en la bata del doctor.

 Me quedé despierto varias horas, pensando en mi accidente. Me acordaba bien como se sentía su cuerpo cuando lo empujé al separador de la avenida y también recuerdo sentir como si se me viniera una montaña encima pero solo había sido un automóvil que había llegado al semáforo a alta velocidad. Por lo visto el color rojo no significaba nada para ese borracho o drogado o lo que fuese ese maldito desgraciado. No supe que pasó después pero la rabia no me dejó dormir en paz hasta que llegó la luz de la mañana. Tuvo un efecto de calmante y me dormí sin chistar.

 Los días en un hospital pasas lentamente. Debe ser lo mismo que en una cárcel, pues en ambos lugares se está en una pequeña habitación sin posibilidades reales de salir a dar una vuelta. En mi caso, no me dejaban salir porque no podía usar las piernas. No había quedado invalido pero había estado muy cerca. Todos los días venía un enfermero francamente atractivo y él era el encargado de hacer la terapia pertinente para que pudiese mover las piernas lo más pronto posible.

 Mi voz mejoró y pasados algunos días ya pude flirtear un poco con el terapeuta. El solo se ría o sonría y cambiaba de tema. Estaba seguro de que lo hacía sonrojar y eso era una indicación muy clara pero la verdad era que yo solo lo hacía por hacer algo, por sentir que todavía era la misma persona de antes. Además, no quería verme débil ante nadie y no había mejor manera de aparentar que haciéndome el chistoso todo el tiempo, con apuntes y preguntas tontas.

 Pero cuando se iba la gente, volvía a mi estado de casi depresión. Y digo casi porque dudo que haya sido igual a lo que viven muchos, que se sienten hundidos en un hueco del que no pueden salir. Mueven los brazos como locos y simplemente no logran salvarse a si mismos. No es mi caso o eso creo. Yo siento tristeza de lo que me pasó pero más que todo rabia hacia las dos personas que estuvieron en ese momento conmigo, los otros dos protagonistas de la historia.

 El conductor, alguien me dijo, se echó a la fuga antes de atropellarme. Eso era algo que yo no sabía e hizo que mi odio aumentara sustancialmente. Pero lo que me dio rabia, de esa que da ganas de demoler una pared a mordiscos, fue que la persona que yo había empujado no hubiese venido jamás a visitarme. Ni siquiera había preguntado por mi y cuando confronté a mi familia y a los pocos amigos que habían venido a verme, nadie decía nada, como si se tratase de un secreto de estado.

 Le pedí a mi hermana que me trajera mi portátil y obligué al guapo de la terapia a que me diera la clave del internet inalámbrico del hospital. Apenas pude, busque a la persona que salvé en internet y pude ver como se hacía el héroe en cuanta red social podía. Lo peor, era que todo el mundo se creía su ángulo de la historia, así hubiese sido yo el que lo había salvado. No tenía nada de sentido pero para atraer idiotas no hay que tener mucho sentido común, solo palabras atractivas. Palabras en las que nunca se me mencionaba, ni por error o confusión.

 Estuve cuatro meses en el hospital hasta que por fin pude mover las piernas. Tenía que seguir yendo a terapia pero eso no importaba, podía caminar y los pronósticos eran muy positivos. Abracé al guapo de mi terapeuta y le planté un beso en la boca que sorprendió a todos pero más que todo a él. Era mi última gran sorpresa, antes de irme a casa de vuelta a mi habitación y mis cosas. Debo decir que dejar el hospital fue duro, pues regresaba a la cruel vida diaria con el resto de mortales.

 Mi familia solo tenía para mí cariño y los más grandes cuidados. Les pedí que no se fastidiaran tanto estando pendientes de mi estado, puesto que debía avanzar yo solo para mejorar de verdad. Sin embargo, los dejé hacerme ricos postres y llevarme a restaurantes que me gustaban. Era mi momento para mimarme un poco, creo que me lo merecía. Tal vez no me merezca nada en esta vida pero me sentía cansado desde antes del accidente y aprovecharse de una tragedia personal no es tan malo.

 Al fin y al cabo, fue a mi que me levanto ese desgraciado del pavimento. Fui yo quien tuve las piernas casi rotas y fracturas por todo el cuerpo. Fue a mi al que me sangró la cara y otros lugares del cuerpo que prefiero no nombrar. Fui yo quién salvó a un imbécil de ser aplastado por un vehículo a alta velocidad. Así que algunos tendrán que disculpar mis ganas de vivir un momento de vida en tranquilidad, disfrutando de aquellas cosas que solo la buena vida y todo lo que ella implica, pueden aportar.

 Eventualmente dieron con el tipo que me había atropellado. Esta es una ciudad atrasada y llena de idiotas pero por alguna razón providencial, había una cámara de seguridad en un edificio frente al lugar donde me habían atropellado. Se veía todo con una claridad sorprendente y esa fue la pieza clave para dar con el paradero de quién resultó ser una mujer. Se había ido a esconder a otra ciudad pero pronto fue arrestada y se me pidió testificar en contra, algo que hice con todo el gusto.

 Fue a la cárcel, condenada por no sé cuantos años. La gente dice que debería perdonarla pero eso me parece una reverenda estupidez. Esa mujer hizo lo que hizo y lo primero que pensó no fue en ayudar sino en protegerse a si misma. Puede pudrirse en la cárcel.


 En cuanto a la persona que salvé, un día se me acercó en un cine y me pidió disculpas. Yo le dije que no tenía tiempo puesto que estaba en la mitad de algo importante. Tomé de la mano a mi terapeuta y la expliqué quién era la persona que me había saludado. “Nadie importante”, le dije.

miércoles, 20 de septiembre de 2017

Mi sangre

   La sangre empezó a caer como si hubiera tenido un grifo en la cara. Había pasado de la nada. Momentos antes, solo había estado pensando en mi vida, en cosas varias como uno hace seguido en los buses. El chorro de liquido en mi mano y mi entrepierna me alertó de que algo pasaba. Si mi sangre hubiese sido más sutil, creo que no me hubiese dado cuenta hasta más tarde. El caso es que todavía estaba a unos diez minutos de mi casa, caminando. Esperé como pude, tapándome la nariz, cubriéndome con una hoja de mi curriculum.

 Mi hoja de vida, de trabajo o como se le quiera llamar era lo único que tenía a mano y, para ser sincero conmigo mismo, nunca había sido más que un montón de garabatos escritos en un papel duro y sin gracia. La hoja se consumió rápidamente, como si mi sangre fuese el fuego de una hoguera que carcome todo lo que se encuentra a su paso. Mis pies se movían, la sangre en mis piernas y manos chorreaba al suelo y la gente ya empezaba a mirarme más de lo que resulta cómodo.

 Apenas vi mi parada, timbré unas cinco veces y me bajé golpeándome el hombre contra la puerta del bus. Alguien dijo algo detrás de mí pero no le puse cuidado porque seguro era algo que no me interesaba oír. Con la mochila casi vacía en mi espalda y el papel sangriento en mi cara, caminé los pocos metros que me separaban de mi casa. Tenía que cruzar un parque para llegar, el mismo parque donde no hacía mucho habíamos jugado con una mascota que ahora ya era parte de la Tierra.

 No sé si fue pensar en esa bella criatura o si fue causa del chorro de sangre que salía por mi nariz. El caso es que di un traspiés bastante brusco y caí de frente. No me golpee la nariz pero el papel untado de rojo salió volando. La agitación hizo que sangrara más y fue entonces cuando de verdad me sentí mal. La fuerza de mis brazos no estaba ya y empecé a ver todo como si hubiese un vidrio sucio frente a mi cara. Lo último que vi fue una sombra que me asustó, luego ruidos ininteligibles y luego nada.

 Tuve un sueño muy raro, en el que estaba sentado sobre una silla en la mitad de un campo enorme, muy verde. El cielo estaba casi completamente despejado, con solo apenas algunas nubes blancas y gorditas surcando el espacio sobre mi cabeza. Miraba a un lado y al otro del campo verde y no había nada ni nadie más aparte de la silla y de mi. Quise ponerme de pie pero no podía. Ni siquiera lograba moverme. Era como si mi cuerpo no quisiera hacer lo que el cerebro le decía. Me sentí atrapado. Quise gritar pero tampoco pude. No había sonido.

 Cuando desperté, la cabeza me daba miles de vueltas. El mareo fue tal que, aunque no veía nada, mi instinto me dijo que girara la cabeza a la derecha para vomitar. Al parecer hice lo correcto, pues una sombra pasó corriendo por el lado, como si fuese a buscar a otra persona. Sabía que debía estar en mi casa o en algún lugar por el estilo. No tuve mucho tiempo para adivinarlo pues me desmayé a los pocos segundos. Mi fuerza estaba ausente, completamente drenada.

 Abrí lo ojos de nuevo mucho después. Era de noche, eso sí que lo podía percibir. Mi vista estaba un poco mejor pero todo seguía pareciendo una de las peores pesadillas de mi vida. Los sonidos se aclaraban poco a poco, a veces escuchándose más fuertes y a veces más suaves. Agradecí que alguien, tal vez una enfermera, había cerrado la puerta. No quería saber mucho de lo que pasaba afuera de esa habitación. Ya había adivinado que era un hospital y no mi casa.

 Oí pasos y fingí dormir. La puerta se abrió y se cerró y una forma humana se acercó a mi. No sabía como era su rostro pero sabía que lo tenía muy cerca al mío. Estuvo haciendo algo allí, luego me tomó la muñeca izquierda, se quedó quieto y luego se fue. Por el tamaño de los dedos pude deducir que era un hombre y era muy probable que fuese mi doctor. Tuve ganas de abrir los ojos y la boca y preguntarle que era lo que estaba pasando pero supe que no tendría la capacidad de hacer ninguna de esas cosas.

 Resolví dormir de nuevo y eso me sirvió un poco, a pesar de que la pesadilla de la silla volvió a mi mente. Lo único diferente era que esta vez todo ocurría de noche y era mucho más terrorífico que antes. Podía sentir muchas presencias a mi alrededor, murmullos y sombras que se movían de un lado y del otro. De nuevo, no me podía mover de la silla y sí que quería hacerlo, quería salir corriendo de allí y refugiarme en algún lugar familiar. Pero dentro de mí sabía que eso no era posible.

 Cuando me desperté de la pesadilla, el doctor estaba al lado mío. Creo que se asustó porque se retiró de golpe y su bolígrafo cayó al suelo. No supe que hacer en el momento, empezando porque mi sentido del oído había vuelto por completo y el de la vista estaba en camino de estar como antes. El hombre me revisó en silencio y no dijo nada durante todo el rato. Yo quise decirle algo pero no pude. No solo porque las palabras no estaban a la mano, sino porque mi garganta se sentía como llena de pelusa, como si muchos gatos la hubiera utilizado como resbaladilla.

 Estuve en el hospital una semana y luego otra más. Casi un mes completo allí cuando, por fin, me dieron de alta. Tuve que ir a un consultorio para que me dijeran los resultados de todos los exámenes que me habían estado haciendo. Mis padres estaban allí porque alguien tenía que pagar la cuenta del hospital. De resto, se suponía que yo era un adulto responsable de si mismo. Me dio rabia estar allí en ese momento, sintiéndome aún pero de lo que ya me había sentido.

 En resumen, el médico declaró que tenía un problema serio de la sangre y que no tenían claro que era lo que sucedía. Al parecer no era cáncer ni ninguna enfermedad de transmisión sexual. Casi me rio cuando mencionó ese detalle pues hacía casi un año que yo no había tocado otro cuerpo humano. Dijo muchas cosas que no entendí y otro montó que la verdad no quise escuchar. Los médicos hablan demasiado a veces y se les olvida que atienden seres humanos.

 Salimos de allí después de pagar y volvimos a casa. Mis padres me miraban como si tuviera la peste o algo peor. Como si les fuese a saltar al cuello en cualquier momento. Yo no hice nada más sino ir a mi habitación y encerrarme allí. Se suponía que tenía que seguir una dieta estricta y ciertas reglas en mi vida, como no agitarme ni nada parecido. Se me habían prohibido las actividades extenuantes, así que por fin era útil ser un desempleado más de un país en el olvido.

 Estuve varios días en mi habitación, viendo películas y comiendo y no haciendo nada. Se suponía que también tenía que ejercitarme pero simplemente no lo hice. Mi cuerpo dolía demasiado por todo lo que me habían hecho y simplemente no tenía el humor de ponerme a torturar mi cuerpo. Era algo muy idiota pensar que alguien en mi estado se iba a poner a esforzarse tanto de la noche a la mañana y sin más, sin una charla de verdad, sin consejos ni confidencias y nada que me hiciera sentir seguro.

 Pasadas dos semanas, mi nariz empezó a sangrar de nuevo, mientras estaba en el portátil. La sangre empezó a meterse por entre las teclas, manchando mis dedos y dañando internamente el aparato. Y yo solo miraba absorto el liquido medio espeso.


 Quise saber cuanto era necesario para empezar a marearme de nuevo. Quería ver cuanto faltaba para sentirme tan mal como antes. Fue entonces que me di cuenta: yo mismo me había hecho sangrar. No sabía como pero sí sabía porqué. No dije nada, ni llamé a nadie mientras mi cama se iba manchando por mi fuego interno.

lunes, 8 de mayo de 2017

Inside

   Of the first night, I only remember when one of the nurses looked at me and she had this weird expression on her face. It wasn’t really fear but something else. Maybe it was pity or something similar. Anyways, I will always remember her face over mine, looking down on me. I felt I was already on the hole to be buried. You tend to get very dramatic when you’re sick. And that was the first time I was really sick. Doctors would tell me, months later, that I could have died.

 It was the fever that prevented me from remembering anything from that first day. But as time went by, I started remembering more and more things. For example, I know for a fact that on the second day, a male nurse came and stared at me for several minutes. I think he thought I was asleep or in a coma or something. I knew he was there because of his reflection on the window. It was very creepy. Maybe he did something to patients or something. I would know about it later.

 They gave me actual food only a week after I had entered the hospital. Before that everything had to get in me through an IV. I felt miserable, weak and fearful that so many things could happen. I was scared they would discover something in me that might mean then end of my life. I thought that stay in the hospital would be the death o f me and, again,  I don’t think you can blame someone for being overdramatic in a hospital. Awful things happen in those places every day.

 Luckily, with time, I was able to recuperate. It wasn’t fast at all but at least not every single bone in my body was aching. The pain started to go away and I was just so grateful that it was all coming to an end. I felt it was going to be going on for many more weeks but thankfully it didn’t. They did not discover anything strange, rather the opposite. What they did tell me was that I wasn’t eating well and that I should be trying to eat more regularly and more types of food.

 True, I had been neglecting my meals before getting sick. I had lost any interest in food or in anything that wasn’t going to give me what I really needed in life. I became obsessed with achieving one goal and it was then when I became ill and couldn’t even continue achieving that goal. I wanted to be successful and finally prove myself and others that I was worth something. That drive lasted shortly, as my stay in the hospital just changed everything for me. I didn’t do what to do, again. I was confused and relieved at the same time, it was pretty confusing.

 One month after leaving the hospital, I had to go back for a check up. They wanted to verify everything was ok. I had all the time needed because my ambition had been cut short and now I had no idea what to do, how to proceed. Unfortunately, I fainted in the waiting room, just as the doctor was preparing to receive me. They laid my body on a stretcher and gave me something so I could sleep for a couple of hours. Somehow, they knew I hadn’t been able to do it by myself for weeks.

 That time, they did found out that I had some sort of disease, a condition as they said. It’s very difficult to explain what it is and the name is even stranger but the point is that thing makes me weaker as time goes by. It has been inside me for a long time and now it will live in me forever until my death, which might be caused by it. Not directly but the weaknesses my body have will enable diseases and other awful stuff to just come through and attack my body in the easiest way.

 I was put in a room again and stayed in the hospital for a couple of days. I remember I cried a lot that time, because I felt I finally knew when and where I was going to die. Of course, I didn’t know for sure but it was pretty obvious that I would have to deal with something that most people have no idea about. If I had ever wanted to go back and try again l my failed attempts to be successful, with those news it seemed my world had ended and there was no way to turn it back on.

 I didn’t know what to do. When I saw my parents checking the prices of the pills I would have to take for life, I felt even more like a leech, useless and pathetic. I can recognize that I thought about killing myself but my body or something else wouldn’t let me. I found myself to feel not only weak but empty. I had nothing left inside and couldn’t even fathom the possibility of feeling anything ever again. I was in my lowest point ever and only a miracle could save me.

And it did. As it happens, I had been taking pictures and putting them online, for several years actually. I had many followers but they rarely commented. One of them was the male nurse that stood by my bed that time I got sick. I ran into him this one time, when I went for another check up. He reunited the courage to tell me he was a huge fan of mine and that he would love if I accepted to have coffee or something with him. Feeling so down, I said yes only to keep walking and reach my doctor’s office. I even gave him my cellphone number.

 Days later, he called and told me he could go near my house if I preferred. The point is, he is the most charming person in the world. We have been talking for a few months now and I think his interest and original take on everything that is happening to me, helps a lot in making me feel less sick of myself and more proud of the few things I’ve done. He makes me feel good when we’re together and that’s the best. He likes to hold my hands a lot and hugging me is a apparently a hobby for him.


 My disease is still there though and sometimes I can almost feel it moving through me. I feel like a bomb about to go off but no one knows exactly when, not me, not the doctors, not my family. But one day. The important thing is, it’s now right now and that’s something.